Personal tools
  • View
  • Add/Edit Basic Information
  • Add/Edit Riche Classification

Social Inequality and Children's Mental Health

Document type: Projects: In progress/completed
Document language: English
Uploaded By: Allan Colver (allancolver)
Date Uploaded: 2012/01/11 15:05:12.949 GMT+1
URL to a webpage or document based online: http://www.esrc.ac.uk/my-esrc/grants/RES-177-25-0013/read

Basic Information

Authors: Dr Louise Arseneault
Published on Date: 2010
Funding source project: The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)
Abstract:

This project examines how social inequalities influence children's development at three levels of analysis.

At the neighborhood level, it will assess ecometric properties of the local areas in which children reside and test whether neighborhood-level social processes mediate the effects of neighborhood poverty on children's mental health.

At the family level, it will trace the effects of socioeconomic deprivation on proximal family processes and test how stressful early life events may become biologically embedded.

At the individual level, it will use a genetically-informative longitudinal design to test the hypothesis that children's perceptions of their social position can help to explain why some children growing up in poverty do versus do not develop health problems.

This research will be conducted using data from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Study, a longitudinal study of a nationally-representative sample of twins born in England and Wales in 1994-1995. Children's development was monitored over the first 12 years of their lives. Data about the children and their families were gathered at birth, 2, 5, 7, 10, and 12 years. Two ecometric assessments of the neighborhoods in which children are growing up were also conducted to study inequalities in children's lives at the community and family level.


Riche Classification

Taxonomy:
Population Groups: Children in poverty , Socio-economic status ,
Languages and Geographical Perspective: English ,
Study type / scale / state of progress / setting: Longitudinal study - cohort, trend, panel , Ongoing ,